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How impacting are long-term brain injuries?

On Behalf of | Aug 17, 2021 | Brain Injury

People involved in accidents may suffer catastrophic injuries that could impact their life for many years. In particular, traumatic brain injuries may cause memory problems, balance issues, decreased motor skills and other issues. The problems might not manifest until many weeks or months after the initial injury occurred, further complicating an accident victim’s situation. Repeated visits to Washington doctors might be unavoidable, leading to potentially high medical costs.

Accidents and brain injuries

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 2.5 million Americans suffer from traumatic brain injuries each year. There are numerous ways someone may experience such an injury: Any accident that leads to head trauma may cause brain injuries. A car crash, a sports mishap or a slip-and-fall accident may result in concussions or skull fractures. Work or hobby-related pursuits might cause concussions on more than one occasion, and the cumulative effect could prove devastating.

It is conceivable that someone may fall off a bike and feel okay but suffer a terrible, hidden injury. A medical diagnosis may reveal current mental or physical impairments from a brain injury that occurred several years earlier.

Costs, care, liabilities and traumatic brain injuries

In the aftermath of a slip-and-fall accident or vehicle collision, a person might undergo extensive medical examinations. Hopefully, the doctors will make an accurate and comprehensive determination about the condition. In some cases, an injury’s extent is obvious and severe, leading to a lengthy rehab stay.

Some people find that their injuries force them to change careers or rely on caretakers. These situations come with tremendous expenses, and filing a personal injury suit might be the only way to recover financial losses and cover the bills.

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