A traumatic brain injury is a catastrophic injury that can have impacts on the victim for the rest of their life. This can make it difficult to live the life they were accustomed to prior to the accident. Some of the impacts can be controlled but others potentially not perceptible at first will begin to manifest after the injury.

People who have a traumatic brain injury might notice that they have trouble controlling their emotions. They can become depressed or have mood swings. Some are irritable and may suffer from anxiety, which can lead to the need for mental health help.

Communication often becomes difficult. This includes writing, reading and talking. They may have trouble with comprehension and might not be able to relay their thoughts adequately. In some cases, cognition changes make these even more challenging.

A person with a TBI might not be able to remember things and could have trouble with basic reasoning. These can make it difficult to hold down a job without accommodations. In some cases, the person might not be able to make decisions so they’d need a job where they can do repetitive tasks or one where no decision-making skills are necessary.

Sometimes, the senses are impacted. This can change the way that the person hears because of hearing loss or ringing in the ears. Changes in taste and sight are also possible. The senses might return to normal over time, but this isn’t always the case.

One thing that is universal is that a person who has a traumatic brain injury will likely need extensive medical care in the early days and close monitoring for life. This helps them to find and address any issues that creep up because of the injury.